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How To Fit Up VE Brakes Pads & Rotors

Discussion in 'VE Holden Commodore (2006 - 2013)' started by Irishmist, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. Irishmist

    Irishmist Irishmist

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    Introduction
    The following document describes the tools and parts required to change the brake pads and brake rotors on the VE Commodore.
    Pictures to be loaded later.....

    Tools and Parts Required
    Tools Required
    10mm open ended / Ring Spanner
    18mm open ended spanner
    18mm Socket
    12mm Socket
    21mm Socket
    Large Torque Wrench
    Small Ratchet Wrench
    Brake Bleed Kit
    Brake Line Clamp
    Jack and car stands
    crow bar, or a bar of some description

    Parts Required for V8 Models
    500mm Super Dot 4 Brake Fluid
    Brakeclean Spray
    WD40 Spray

    Front Brake Pads : Bendix DB1765 (Non Redline / Brembo Front Brakes)
    Front Brake Pads : Bendix DB1768 (Redline / Brembo Front Brakes)
    Front Right Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2028SR
    Front Left Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2028SL

    Rear Brake Pads : Bendix DB1766
    Rear Right Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2029SR
    Rear Left Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2029SL


    Parts Required for V6 Models
    500mm Super Dot 4 Brake Fluid
    Brakeclean Spray
    WD40 Spray

    Front Brake Pads : Bendix DB1765
    Front Right Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2026SR
    Front Left Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2026SL

    Rear Brake Pads : Bendix DB1766
    Rear Right Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2027SR
    Rear Left Rotor : DBA Street Slotted DBA2027SL



    Step 1 - Jack up car and remove wheel
    Remove the plastic wheel nut covers from the wheel nuts if fitted.
    Using the 21mm socket, and the large torque wrench, loosen the 5 bolts holding the wheel to the hub
    Using the jack, raise the vehicle so as the wheel is off the ground.
    Using the car stands, support the vehicle so as the car will not accidentally fall if the trolley fails.
    Chock the wheels that remain on the ground using bricks, so as to prevent the vehicle from moving forward or backwards, off the trolley / stands.


    Remove the 5 loosened bolts holding the wheel on to the hub.
    Remove the wheel from the hub




    Step 2 - Inspect the Brake Pads for Wear
    Once the wheel has been removed, the brake pads should be inspected to determine if they will require replacement.
    The following image shows the front brake pads fitted to a VE Commodore.

    The brake pads displayed above have roughly 1/5th of the pad volume of a brand new pad.
    This pad may require replacement within the next 5000 kilometers.


    Step 3 - Removing the Brake Caliper
    There are two 12mm bolts that hold the brake caliper on to the brake caliper assembly.
    If you wish to simply change the brake pads, and not the brake rotor, you would simply loosen the lower brake caliper bolt, and remove the upper brake calper bolt.

    Once the lower brake caliper bolt has been removed, you will be able to swing the brake caliper upwards.
    This will allow you to change the brake pads without completely removing the brake caliper assembly.


    Because we will be replacing the brake rotor, as well as the brake pads, we will need to remove the brake caliper completely from the caliper bracket.
    To do this, remove the top 12mm bolt holding the brake caliper in place.

    Click to view this image in high definition
    Next, remove the brake caliper, and rest it on a box or stand.
    NOTE: Do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake line, as this may damage the brake line and connectors.

    Finally, remove the brake pads from the brake caliper assembly, by sliding the brake pads outwards from the caliper assembly.




    Step 4 - Removing the Brake Caliper Mounting Assembly
    To remove the brake caliper mounting assembly, you will need to use a large torque wrench, and an 18mm Socket.
    The following image displays the two bolts that need to be removed in order to remove the brake caliper mounting assembly.


    Please Note: These bolt require a great deal of torque in order to be removed !
    It is recommended that you loosen both bolts before completely removing the upper or lower bolt, as this will aid in supporting the bracket whilst you completely loosen either of these bolts.

    Once the bolts have been removed, simply slipe the brake caliper mounting bracket away from the brake rotor.



    Step 5 - Removing the Existing Brake Rotor from the Hub
    This step can be rather tricky when attempting for the very first time.
    If the rotor has been on the vehicle for a number of years, then it will most probably have a small amount of surface rust around the rotor and the hub.

    In order to loosen the rotor from the hub, it is recommended to use a small amount of WD40 around the areas where the rotor meets up with the hub.
    This includes around the middle of the rotor, as well as around the bolts used to mount the wheel.

    NOTE: Do not use excessive amount of WD40.
    To further loosen the rotor, use a small hammer, and tap around the hat area on the rotor evenly.
    This step will assist in breaking the surface rust around the bolt areas and the area where the disc rotor hat joins up with the hub assembly.
    IMPORTANT NOTE: If you wish to keep the brake rotor for use or machining later, do not strike the rotors brake surface with the hammer.
    This will mark the surface area, and warp the brake disc, rendering it useless !!!

    Once you have completed the above step (You should strike the brake rotor hat area roughly 20 or 30 times to help loosen the rotor from the hub),
    you can then attempt to prise the disc rotor from the hub assembly using a crow bar, or bar of some description.

    IMPORTANT NOTE: Use the bar to lever the back of the disc rotor hat area, and the area where the brake caliper mounting assembly mates with the hub assembly.
    Do not use the brake rotor surface area when prising the brake rotor from the hub, as this could lead to warping the brake rotor.

    This step will take some time, and you may need to rotate the rotor a quarter of a turn, as well as strike the brake rotor hat with a hammer a couple more times to completely loosen the brake rotor from the hub assembly.



    Finally, your should be able to remove the brake rotor, leaving you with the hub assembly.


    Step 6 - Fitting the New Brake Rotor to the Hub
    You are now past the halfway point, and fortunately things do get easier from this point onwards.

    OPTIONAL: If you wish to clean the hub assembly, and the brake caliper, now would be the perfect time to do so.

    To fit the new rotor to the hub, simply align the new brake rotor with the wheel mounting bolts, and slide the rotor in to place.
    If you are using direction rotors (I.E. Slotted), please ensure that you are using the right brake rotor for the correct side of the car.
    For Right Hand Drive Vehicles (Australia, Japan, England), the right rotor should be fitted to the drivers side wheels.
    A rotor marked for the left hand side of the car should be mounted to the passenger side of the vehicle.

    For Left Hand Drive Vehicles (America, Canada) the right rotor should be fitted to the passenger side of the vehicle.
    A rotor marked for the left hand side of the car should be mounted to the drivers side of the vehicle.

    Once the new brake rotor has been fitted, you should use 2 wheel nuts to hold the rotor in place, whilst adding the caliper mounting assembly.

    Finally, the new rotor should be cleaned using the brake clean spray, and a clean cloth.
    Ensure that you spray the brake clean on the brake rotor area that will come in contact with the brake pads.
    This area should be clean of finger prints, stickers, and any grease, dirt or grime, to help assist the brake bedding in process.
    Both sides of the rotor (The front and back) sides will require cleaning for optimal brake bedding in.



    Step 7 - Fitting the Brake Caliper Mounting Assembly
    The next step involved fitting the brake caliper mounting assembly to the hub, and fitting the new brake pads to the caliper mounting assembly.
    Simply slide the caliper mounting assembly in to place, and fit one of the two 18mm Bolts.
    At this point, simply fit one of the bolts, and give the bolt one or two turns, so as the caliper mounting assembly is loosely held in to place.

    Next, fit the second 18mm Bolt to the brake caliper assembly.
    Fitting the two bolts will prevent the caliper mounting assembly from pivoting around, and will further aid you when tightening the two 18mm bolts.

    Finally Tighten the two 18mm Bolts using the 18mm socket, and a torque wrench.
    These bolts should be tightened to roughly the same torque that was used to originally remove the bolts.

    Once this has been completed, you can now fit the new brake pads to the brake caliper mounting assembly.
    Simply slide the brake pads in to the mounting assembly from the sides, ensuring that the tin anti squeel spacers are in place before doing so.




    Step 8 - Compressing the Caliper Pistons to Fit the Pads
    The next step requires the brake caliper / G clamp to compress the brake caliper pistons so as the brake caliper will fit on to the new brake pads.

    Important Note: The brake fluid should not be forced back in to the Brake Assist / Antilock braking system when compressing the brake caliper pistons.
    To avoid this, you should use a brake line clamp, as well as loosening the brake line bleeder nipple to allow the excess brake fluid to be released through the brake fluid bleed nipple,
    rather than forcing the fluid back up the brake lines, and into the ABS module.

    To make compressing the brake caliper pistons easier, first you should partially mount the brake caliper to the brake caliper mounting assembly, using a single 12mm bolt.
    To do this, fit the upper 12mm brake caliper bolt to the brake caliper, and the brake caliper mounting assembly.
    The bolt does not need to be tightened at this stage, rather the bolt is only used to allow the caliper to be held loosely in place.


    Next, fit the brake line clamp to the brake line, and the brake line bleeder kit to the brake bleed nipple located on the brake caliper.

    Next, ensure that the brake fluid resevior has sufficient brake fluid. (I.E. the brake fluid level should be very close to the maximum level.

    Next, loosen the brake line bleed nipple around 1/2 a turn using a 10mm ring / open ended spanner, to allow the brake fluid to bleed from the brake line.

    Finally, using the brake caliper clamp / G Clamp, begin to slowly compress the brake caliper piston, as shown in the following image.


    Continue this step for both brake caliper pistons, ensuring that both pistons are compressed completely.
    Note: You should not require excessive force to compress the pistons, if excessive force is required, attempt to re-seat the caliper clamp and try again.

    Once both brake caliper pistons are completely compressed, tighten the brake line bleed nipple using the 10mm ring/open ended spanner and attempt to fit the brake caliper over the new brake pads.

    If the brake caliper does not fit over the new brake pads, then you may need to further compress the brake caliper pistons untill this step can be acheived.

    Finally, fit the lower 12mm brake caliper mouting bolt, and tighten both the upper and lower brake caliper mounting bolts using the 18mm open ended ring spanner, and the 12mm socket and ratchet.



    Step 9 - Bleeding the Brake Lines
    In order to make sure that no air has entered the brake lines from the previous step, you should now take the opportunity to bleed the brake line.

    Bleeding the brake line will prevent the brake pedal feeling spongy when the brake pedal is applied during normal dirving.

    Fit the brake line bleeding kit to the brake calipers brake line bleeding nipple.
    Next, ensure that there is sufficient brake fluid in the brake fluid resevior. (I.E. the brake fluid should be close to the maximum level).

    Using a Single Person Brake Bleeding Kit
    If you are using a single person brake bleeding kit, then simply loosen the brake line bleed nipple 1/4 of a turn (using a 10mm open ended spanner), and slowly depress the brake pedal three times.
    Once completed, tighten the brake line bleeder nipple using the 10mm spanner.

    Optional method if not using a single person brake bleeder kit
    If you are not using a single person brake line bleeder kit, then you will require a second person to depress the brake pedal.
    Before loosening the brake line bleeder nipple, ask a second person to put some pressure on the brake pedal.
    Alert the second person that the brake pedal will travel to the floor, and that they should not release pressure on the brake pedal.
    Next, Loosen the brake line bleeder nipple 1/4 of a turn using the 10mm open ended spanner.
    The brake pedal will now travel completely to the floor, and the brake fluid will flow out from the brake bleeder nipple.
    Once the brake pedal has travelled to the floor, tighten the brake line bleeder nipple, and release the brake pedal.
    Continue the above steps a further two times, keeping an eye on the brake fluid level in the brake fljuid resevior.

    Once either of the above methods have been completed, test the brake pedal travel by depressing a couple of times to ensure that the pedal travel is not excessive,
    and that the brake pedal feels firm.
    If the brake pedal travels to the floor, or the pedal travel feels spongy, then you will need to carry out the above steps again to remove the excessive air in the brake lines.

    Note: 3 brake pedal depressions uses roughly 50mm of brake fluid.


    Step 10 - Fitting the Wheel, and Bedding in the System
    Once you are completely satisfied that the brake lines have no air in them, and that all the bolts have been tightened sufficiently, then you will be able to fit the wheel,
    and continue changing the brake pads and rotor for the other side of the vehicle.

    Before fitting the wheel, you need to check the following,
    1) That all bolts have been tightened to their correct torque.
    2) That the brake bleed nipple has been tightened to prevent brake fluid from escaping.
    3) That any excessive brake fluid is cleaned from the brake parts such as rotor, caliper, and hub assembly.
    4) That the brake rotor is clean from any fluids, dirt, grease, or fingerprints.
    5) That the brake caliper sufficiently holds the brake rotor when the brake pedal is depressed.
    6) That the brake pedal travel is not excessive, and that the brake pedal does not feel spongy or abnormal.

    NOTE:When chaning brake pads and rotors, ensure that you change both sides before bedding in the brake system.
    Bedding in the brake system allows the surface of the brake pad to properly mate with the surface of the brake rotor.
    A proper bedding in proceedure allows the brake pad material to properly bond with the brake rotor, by applying the brakes at speed,
    allowing the brake pads to sufficiently heat up, and bond to the heated and clean brake rotor.
    At no time whilst bedding in the brake system should the vehicle be completely stopped suddenly, or harshly.
    Completely stopping the vehicle whilst bedding in the brake system will cause a buildup of brake pad material on the brake rotor, at the place where the brake pad and rotor meet, when stopped.
    The idea is to allow the brake pad to evenly distribute its material over the brake rotor, by using a consistant braking force, and allowing the rotor to continuosly turn.

    Bedding In Proceedure
    To bed in your new brake pads and rotors.
    1) Carefully and slowly drive to a safe area where you can apply your brakes without disrupting traffic flow. At this time, do not brake excessively, or apply the brakes at speed.
    2) Once it is safe to do so, accelerate the vehicle to around 50~60Km/Hr, and gently apply the brakes, slowing the vehicle to around 30Km/Hr.
    3) Repeat Proceedure 2 a couple of times to allow the brake pads and rotor to heat up.
    4) Once it is safe to do so, accelerate the vehicle to around 50~60Km/Hr, and apply the brakes vigerously, slowing the vehicle to around 10Km/Hr.
    5) Repeat Proceedure 4 a couple of times to allow the brake pads material to bond with the rotor.
    6) Slowly and Carefully drive the vehicle, allowing the brake pads and rotor to cool. Avoid high speed and harsh stopping proceedures until the brakes have sufficiently cooled.
     
  2. Zerone_V

    Zerone_V New Member

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    Probably easier to just link to the actual doco..
    www.carmodder.com • Brake Pad and Rotor Service for the Holden VE Commodore

    (The doco gets updated once in a while with more infor as people give me feedback).
    Plus, clicking on each image and downloading them will take you a very loooooong time !


    I have just completed fitting Redline front Brembo Calipers, and rotors, and will be adding that to the doco as well.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Cheers
    Matti - ZerOne
     
  3. Zerone_V

    Zerone_V New Member

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    Oh, and if you want rotors and pads cheap, have a look at the site sponsors section, GSL Rallysport.
    GSL RallySport

    Great friendly guys, they gave me a good price for my new rear brake pads (QFM) and rotors (DBA4000s).
     
  4. MYVESSV8

    MYVESSV8 Well-Known Member

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    What wheels are you running on the car? looking at doing the brembo upgrade
     
  5. Zerone_V

    Zerone_V New Member

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    I'm running aftermarket g8 20" rims.
    (a quick way to tell if your rims will clear the brakes, the brembo calipers stick out the same amount as the wheel stud bolts).
    So it's not thediameter of the rim that is the problem, it's the thickness of the caliper (the extra opposing pistons) that causes fouling on the factory rims.

    The Calais v's 18" rims definitely do not clear these :(

    It's funny, the aftermarket wheels and tyres cost more than the brake upgrade itself, but is a required expense.
     
  6. Shorty33

    Shorty33 New Member

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    thankyou for that.
    My VE Omega had no brake problems: no noises; no shudder. But during a routine dealer-service, I was advised that I needed new pads, front and rear, and all discs machined ... for a mere $660.

    A friend helped me replace the front pads yesterday (the rears were fine), and he noted that the lip at the outer edge of the rotors was about 1.5mm.
    He said that I ought to find out the minimum thickness.
    I've looked here on JC, and at the DBA website; and the only thing that google has thrown up is the AC-Delco site, which says that the standard rotor-thickness for a VE is 28.0mm front, and 20.0mm rear.
    But, as I understand it, that would be when the rotors are new. My question is, what is the minimum recommended thickness, please ?

    My reading on this subject tells me that the mimimum might be stamped into the edge of the disc, but before I get underneath the car again, I'm hoping that some on JC already has the answer.

    thankyou
     
  7. Joelene

    Joelene New Member

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    Thanks for the comprehensive description. I would like to add a couple of things though from my own experience and as an A Grade mechanic. This disk pad change applies for basically all Commodores and not just VEs as they are all virtually the same.
    Firstly if you have a good relationship with your Holden Spare Parts dealer you should be able to pick up genuine brake pads for as cheap as after market. I pay around $160 front and $100 rear of genuine pads for VE SS-V V8.
    I also buy AC Delco, which is a Holden Brand, for a VT/VX 6 cyl, rears $40 and front $60 a pair.
     

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