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Best fan clutch brand?

1985VK

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There are a few brands out there. What is the best fan clutch out there?
 

gtrboyy

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Whatever the factory ones are...never actually bought a new clutch fan when can get or stockpile 2nd hand units for beer money as most want thermofan setups.

Had the original 1982 clutchfan/shroud keeping 355 stroker cool in vh commodore,had 2-3 near new backups from mates cars anyway.
 

EYY

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Dayco without a doubt. Had big issues with truflow from new - ended up sending back for a refund. Tried to order through Davies Craig but none in the country and they weren’t much help. Ordered a dayco, had it within 2 days and was perfect.
 

1985VK

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Dayco without a doubt. Had big issues with truflow from new - ended up sending back for a refund. Tried to order through Davies Craig but none in the country and they weren’t much help. Ordered a dayco, had it within 2 days and was perfect.
What was the prob with the Truflow? Those units look beefier and are supposed to be made in the USA.
 

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What was the prob with the Truflow? Those units look beefier and are supposed to be made in the USA.
It was locked solid from brand new. Very scary to drive the car with a locked fan clutch - can’t rev the engine at all without fear of a the fan breaking apart. This is how my original fan clutch died.

Supplier didn’t help the situation though, I would’ve tried another if it didn’t take them 2 months to get back to me (3rd party supplier).

Then fitted the dayco and was perfect. Little more expensive but worth it imo.
 

1985VK

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The last 2 fan clutches on my ride just got tired, the clutch was gradually slipping and would not push much air
 
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1985VK

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Very scary to drive the car with a locked fan clutch - can’t rev the engine at all without fear of a the fan breaking apart.

That would be freaky!
 

1985VK

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I replaced my old original clutch with a Davies Craig.
Has performed well now for about 5 years, no issues
Lots of Dayco around... The fan clutch is about 4 years old and when cold it pushes a fair amount of air. Switching off the motor when it is still cold brings the fan to a quick stop. When its at temperature switching off the motor sees the fan still spin for 3 seconds or so. I do not think it is fully engaging at temperature.

A Davies Craig is bound to cost more but they make a good fan clutch.
 
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1985VK

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There is misinformation on the internet about how a fan clutch works. The clutch should engage more when it is hot to help cool the engine down. It is not about the speed of the car pushing air through the radiator. It is about the heat.

I think Davies Craig has got it right: (my emphasis in bold)

"A thermal clutch fan operates using silicon fluid as a viscous coupling medium. When the clutch is cool and disengaged, most of the silicon fluid is stored in the reservoir allowing your fan clutch to slip relative to your water pump shaft thereby spinning at a lower RPM than the water pump. This saves you money because the horsepower from your engine is not wasted driving a clutch fan when it's not needed. As your engine heats up, the thermal spring on the front of the clutch expands, which opens a valve allowing the silicon fluid to drive your clutch at an increased RPM. This provides more air flow through your radiator, preventing your car from overheating."


https://daviescraig.com.au/faq
 
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