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Driving lights

Silver Streak

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Does anyone know how to hook up the driving lights to high beam , as they are illegal from last September , so to make good use of them which wire do you splice to connect them into, on the SS VE :cops:
 

Silver Streak

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I think that it might be all states in September 08 they past a new rule I can not remember the number but there where quite a few new laws covering the rule here is a copy of some of the new rules
January 24, 2009 12:30am
UNSUSPECTING motorists and road users face a raft of new and revised on-the-spot fines from tomorrow.

Police will immediately enforce the 99 amendments made to the Australian Road Rules when they are adopted by South Australia at midnight tonight.
The changes to the SA Road Traffic Regulations 1999 create new infringements, including more stringent rules for cyclists, and make existing rules more specific.

The changes were printed in the South Australian Government Gazette on September 25 last year. However, neither the Government nor police have further publicised the changes.

A police spokesman said it was a motorist's responsibility to keep up to date with road rules.

It will now be an offence to:

DRIVE with a person or animal on your lap – $95 fine.

RIDE a motorcycle with an animal on the petrol tank – $95 fine.

TAKE children under the age of eight as pillion passengers on a motorcycle – $83 fine.

RIDE a motorcycle and sidecar with the passenger not seated safely, with $83 fines applying for both rider and passenger.

RUN a red light on a bicycle – $231 fine.

DRIVE on a safety ramp or arrester bed to avoid a hand-held stop sign – $231 fine.

MAKE a U-turn across certain dividing lines – $248 fine.

DRIVE in a tramway – $158.

STOP on a painted road island – $54.

The Advertiser's review of the amended laws also reveal fines exist for several obscure practices.

A driver, and now also a passenger, in or on a motor vehicle leading an animal can be hit with a $60 fine. A cyclist leading an animal can be fined $25.

Police traffic support branch Superintendent Mark Fairney said the overwhelming message from the changes was "good drivers just drive".

"The bottom line is, driving is a huge responsibility," he said.

One of the law changes, relating to the use of fog lights, already has sparked debate among motorists and road safety experts.

While the rules have been changed to allow the use of fog lights during adverse weather conditions such as fog, heavy rain, dust and smoke, motorists using fog lights in clear conditions could face a $160 fine.

Fog lights are defined as a pair of white or yellow low-beam lights operated independently of headlights at the front of the vehicle and not reflecting into the driver's eyes, and a red light of less than 27 watts at the rear of the vehicle.

Road safety experts have long encouraged motorists to use headlights during the day and night when driving on country roads.

A Motor Accident Commission spokesman also said it was important to switch on headlights while driving on country roads.

"The Motor Accident Commission supports the voluntary `lights on' programs that run in country SA which encourage the use of low-beam headlights during the day to improve visibility for oncoming traffic," he said.

"Fog lights should only be used at low speeds in poor driving conditions."

Supt Fairney said the new rules would make things clearer.

"This legislation should end the danger of being blinded by oncoming traffic," he said.

"We've all had the experience of being blinded by oncoming lights while driving and this legislation should reduce that."

RAA road traffic and safety manager Rita Excell said the organisation had spent five years canvassing for change on fog lights.

"This is about clearing up when you can and can't use fog laps so drivers can't say they didn't know they couldn't use them," she said.

Allen Renfrey has clocked up 4.8 million kilometres driving trucks and taxis around Adelaide for the past 49 years and welcomed the fog lights ban.

"It's the best thing since sliced bread. You don't need fog lamps in the metropolitan area," he said.

"I find them very irritating when you're driving towards them, they're worse than having lights on high beam.

"If you're driving a low car, like a small coupe, and there's a four-wheel-drive behind you with its lights on they shine right in the back window. It's dangerous and it's stupid."

But Ford Falcon driver Robyn Ricks said more light was better.

"I drive around with all the lights on (at night)," Ms Ricks said.

"Fog lights give you more visibility and they're a wider light
 
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Silver Streak

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Do a search and you will find that it is in all states under different rule numbers , yes it is true I know a couple of people that have been stung but the police for driving on the driving lights
 

Silver Streak

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Changes to the Australian Road Rules
25 January 2009
On 25 January 2009, changes were made to the Australian Road Rules which were agreed on by all states and territories across Australia.The National Transport Commission undertook a national public consultation process regarding the changes.

The majority of changes are slight variations to current road rules so as to clarify the meaning to all drivers. Most amendments do not entail a change in general driver behaviour.

Other amendments of note are as follows:

Fog lights

Drivers can only use front fog lights in hazardous weather conditions. This brings the rule into line with the existing situation for rear fog lights. Use of fog lights in other conditions can dazzle oncoming drivers. Previously front fog lights that dazzled approaching drivers were dealt with as an offence under a different rule.

$140
Riding on motorbikes

The passenger in a sidecar is to be seated safely. It is an offence for both rider and passenger if the passenger is not seated safely. Previously there was no requirement that the passenger be seated in the side car.

A rider is prohibited from carrying a passenger under 8 years old except in a sidecar. Previously the rule relied upon the passenger being able to reach footrests. This caused confusion for some riders. The amendment makes the rule more certain.

$83
Carrying people on a bicycle

This amends the existing rule that prohibits a person carrying more people on the bicycle than the bicycle is designed for. The change requires persons to be in seats or positions designed for travelling on a bicycle.

It is an offence for both the rider and the passenger if the passenger is not sitting in the position designed for the passenger. Previously there was no offence for the passenger not sitting in a seat.

$25
Travelling with animals on a motorcycle

This rule has been amended to prohibit a motorcycle rider from travelling with an animal carried on the petrol tank of the bike (excluding farm animals carried for less than 500 metres).

$95
Travelling with passenger or animal on lap

This rule creates an offence for a driver to have a passenger or animal on their lap when driving.

$95
Arrester bed

A driver must not drive in an arrester bed unless the driver must do so in the interests of safety. Arrester beds will be designated by signs.

$231
U-turns across single dividing lines

This amendment clarifies the duty of drivers not to make a u-turn across a single continuous centre line.

$248
Stop on painted island

A driver must not stop on a painted island. This amendment is in the parking provisions. It prevents parking on a painted island. It does not prevent a driver from stopping on a painted island when entering or leaving a road. A driver may have to stop on a painted island to give way to approaching traffic.

$54
Leading an animal while driving a vehicle

This rule previously prohibited a driver or rider from leading an animal while driving. The rule has been extended to cover the passenger as it is just as dangerous for the passenger to be leading the animal.

$60

The following two rules have been included as part of the national scheme but are not used in South Australia at this time.

Bicycle rider entering bicycle storage box

This rule establishes bicycle storage boxes for bicycle riders to accommodate this traffic engineering device.

$25
Tramway

The amendments will prohibit driving in a tramway. A tramway will be indicated by signs and yellow lines.

$158

The motoring public should continue to focus on driving with care and attention to the conditions and the signage that exists. Most changes to the road rules do not involve a modification in general driver behaviour. Good drivers just drive, and they are courteous and careful in doing so.

A full set of the Australian Road Rules is available on the South Australian Legislation web site or SAPOL at South Australia Police :: Home, and search “road rules”.
 

ozengines

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I was about to ask this question about driving/fog lights when I found this thread.
I have a VX SS Ex-Chaser with lights in the lower front bumper. They are not called FOG lights by Holden and fog lights are usually yellow. If they are called Driving light then the rules for inter-locking with high beam has been around since Noah's Ark. (60's) and these are not linked to high beam.
So what sort of light are they and when can they be used. I know of people around Coffs Harbour that have been booked with these lights on in daylight !!
I run mine on with the parkers during the day but do not want to get booked. I have passed highway patrols lately and not stopped !! There seems to be no consistency in the policing.
 

BullittSV6

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I was about to ask this question about driving/fog lights when I found this thread.
I have a VX SS Ex-Chaser with lights in the lower front bumper. They are not called FOG lights by Holden and fog lights are usually yellow. If they are called Driving light then the rules for inter-locking with high beam has been around since Noah's Ark. (60's) and these are not linked to high beam.
So what sort of light are they and when can they be used. I know of people around Coffs Harbour that have been booked with these lights on in daylight !!
I run mine on with the parkers during the day but do not want to get booked. I have passed highway patrols lately and not stopped !! There seems to be no consistency in the policing.
I've been stopped for having my fog lights on while on the highway on a clear night, but that was in the grace period so I wasn't booked. Driving with them on in the metro area makes no sense. I believe it doesn't matter what they are called, just that they are operated independantly of high beams.

I personally find the fog lights do a great job of lighting up the sides of the road where a roo might jump out, and that WM Caprice normal beam headlights are more dazzling. In the end just don't drive around with them on and only use when you need them. Easy.
 
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