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Homemade intake

Discussion in 'VE Holden Commodore (2006 - 2013)' started by monkeyboy, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. adamenp

    adamenp New Member

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    hey monkeyboy

    how u finding the new intake ? is it much louder ? any noticable gain in power ?

    cheers
     
  2. monkeyboy

    monkeyboy New Member

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    Well it sounds cool...but I haven't dynoed it so I have no idea about power. Throttle response is off the hook though :)
     
  3. rum87

    rum87 New Member

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  4. monkeyboy

    monkeyboy New Member

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    That's the exact pipe I got. You WILL have to trim it down to make it fit though. Make sure you measure carefully and cut of LESS than you need...that way you can trim it down exactly to fit. I made mine fit but it takes some patience and it's a pretty tight squeeze. When you're done it should look like this:


    With the growler the 4" HSV MAF pipe whistles longer and louder than with the factory MAF pipe...so it's gotta be sucking more air in :)
     

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  5. rum87

    rum87 New Member

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    ok thnx for that, was there much of a difference between it and the standard one?
     
  6. strgas

    strgas GRA = REAL HP

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    To rib or not to Rib is the question . Ribs add strength to the piping as well . good job on the intake one problem i see is the sharp 90 degree bend near the throttle body not real good for flow as the air will travel at two different speeds thru this part of the hose
     
  7. galahs

    galahs Member

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    I originally posted this on Steetcommodores forum after being inspired by Monkeyboy, but I thought I'd repost it here as well.



    As you can see. The standard SIDI V6's intake pipe has a very restrictive expansion chamber setup.

    [​IMG]

    This is designed to reduce intake noise, but as a side result, actually decreases the engines ability to breathe. We all know 4 stroke engines are just giant air pumps and by restricting their ability to breathe in (air intake system) or out (exhaust system) we hurt both power production and fuel economy.

    This photo is looking down into the expansion chamber from the air box end of the standard intake pipe. You can see how the airflow is directed to enter the expansion chamber, which is very bad for airflow.

    [​IMG]


    Originally we were going to fit a pod system, but after further evaluation we decided to keep the stock airbox as we believe it breathes well enough for a 3.6 litre V6 and we didn't want to have to find a way of relocating the MAF sensor. Plus we have an interesting Stage 2 idea that we will share with you later ;)
    but if you want, you can hook up this to a Growler system or even extend it further yourself with some more pvc pipe and add a pod filter.

    So we took Monkeyboys great idea of using PVC pipe and ran with it. Off to Bunnings for some research and development.

    As mentioned by monkeyboy, if pvc gets hot it will soften. So we want to ensure the pvc pipe doesn't touch the metal throttle body of the engine. By having just the rubber coupling touching it, we drastically reduce the heat transfer from the hot engine to the pvc intake pipe we are about to create.

    One of the tricky parts of this mod is the AIRBOX opening diameter is 90mm and the Throttle body of the V6 SIDI is only 80mm. Rubber works as a good joiner as it expands and contracts very well.

    By using 90mm PVC plumbing pipes with gentle bends we can maximise airflow into the throttle body allowing the engine to breathe as best as it can.



    Ok for our replacement MAF pipe, you will need from Bunnings:

    = 2 x 80mm (76-85mm) Ferco Rubber PVC Pipe Joiners. The come with 2 stainless steel clamps (Plumbing Section). ($20 each)

    = 1 x 45 degree 90mm PVC pipe elbow bend (Male to Female Ends) (Plumbing Section). ($3 each)

    = 3 x 22.5 degree 90mm PVC pipe elbow bends (Male to Female Ends) (Plumbing Section). ($3 each)

    = 1 x 13mm black plastic pipe (Garden Hose Section). ($1 each)


    ASSEMBLY
    Remove the hose clamps off the Rubber pipe joiners.

    Attach the pvc pipe so it goes...
    45 deg --> 22.5 deg --> 22.5 deg --> 22.5 deg to make a sweeping bend.

    Cut one of the rubber pipe joiners with either a hack saw or sharp knife so it is only 70mm long.

    Stretch the cut joiner (the freshly cut end) over the open end of 45 deg pipe elbow.

    Now stretch the uncut rubber pipe joiner over the open end of the 22.5 deg pipe elbow. This may be a tight fit.


    Now slide the other open end of the uncut rubber onto your air box.

    [​IMG]


    Now slide the cut joiner (uncut end with clamp groove still intact) over throttle body.

    Attach 4 clamps to rubber joiners. Don't over tighten. Just do it enough so it is air tight.

    And there you have it. A simple efective, low restriction MAF air duct that costs less than $60 and one you can easily reverse if you ever want to revert the car back to stock.


    If you don't like the appearance of white pvc, you could paint it matt black with heat proof paint ($10) for that stock look or wrap it in some sort of heat wrap or pipe insulation to keep your intake pipe cooler. We inserted our intake pipe through some kitchen stove Range hood vent pipe which we are using as a heat shield (and stage 2 of our intake)

    [​IMG]


    As for the engine crankcase breather hose, we just heated one end of our 13mm plastic garden pipe, flared its end a touch, and then just plugged it into the existing 90 degree socket left after you unplugged it from the standard intake pipe, and directed it to dump its oily fumes diagonally down to the ground along side the left hand chassis rail. We figure we dont want oily air dirtying up our air intake, throttle body and plenum, making them sticky, dirty and less efficient.

    ..... BUT....

    if you do super duper care for the environment, you could easily drill a hole in the side of the pvc pipe, feed the hose in there and seal it up to make it air tight with silcon sealant.


    What we did to make our ram air pickup.

    First we removed the stock airbox and disconnected the stock intake snorkel.

    Next we removed the fog light. There were two (or three???) nuts on the back of the assembly. (The hex screw accessible from the front is for headlight beam adjustment, you don't need to undo it)

    We then popped the plastic fog light shroud out. Its held in by a few plastic tabs and pushes out forward but requires a fair bit of force. We then drilled holes in the fake hex mesh of the fog light shroud, and used a small hack saw blade to cut them out and a small file to smooth out the jagged edges.

    Then we extended the hole in the metal bracket that holds the fog light lower, as this is where we are going to pic the air up from. We used a dremel cutting tool to do it. Then smothed the edges and applied some paint on the cut surfaces to prevent corrosion.
    [​IMG]

    We then re-installed the fog light.

    We then got some 110mm pvc pipe, cut it to a length of 12cm, heated it with a heat gun to make it soft, and then with a gloved hand, squished it into an oval shape piece of pipe then bent the outside edge into a rolled edge creating a bellmouth. It took a few attempts and re heats to get the right size for the cutout that it was a nice tight (interfence) fit.

    We then fitted our 110mm range hood exhaust duct (you could use any flexible pipe) to the non bellmouthed end of our new air pick up with a couple of zip ties. Then we installed the bellmouth pick up into position under the fog light. We then used the off-cut rubber from the ferco seals we used for the MAF intake pipe and some silicon sealer to ensure a snug fit up against where the fog light shroud would sit so all air will be forced up the new intake not around it.

    We then popped the fog light shroud (grill) back on
    [​IMG]
    (we will paint the pvc bellmouth black in the future for a stealth look)

    We then cut our range hood exhaust duct to length, and fed it into the opening of the air box, manipulating it to shape and then used silicon sealer to hold it in place for a nice air tight fit.
    [​IMG]

    There you have it, a ram air pick up that feeds the air box with cold air from outside the engine bay and hopefully with forward momentum of the car actually creates a positive airpressure in the airbox.

    We have decided to keep the stock filter and just change it yearly (Holden recommends every 2 years) rather than purchase an expensive K&N type drop in filter. Why?

    Because the stock filters large design flows good enough for us, plus it filters much better than the drop in K&N filters (saving your engine some wear an tear). We also couldn't be bothered with having to wash and re-oil K&N filters. (Don't forget as well as washing them, you often have to get out tweezers and pick out grass seeds and insect wings that get jammed into the filters cotton fibres. A ram air pick up will mean the filters pick up a lot more debris than the stock pickup behind the front bumper )

    And best of all, basically everything we have done can be easily reversed back to stock if we decide to sell the car (minus the cutup fog light shroud). the hardest part would be peeling away the silicon sealer from the airbox. but that isn't difficult)

    After a week of driving we have been super happy with the 2 intake mods. The engine sounds better under acceleration and after driving on open stretches of road, the intake pipes feel super cold to touch, and that has to be good.

    This mod wont make a dramatic power increase, but it definately allows the engine to work a touch more efficiently, and that has to be a good thing. Especially when it all cost us less than $80 making it not only cheaper than all the "off the the shelf" options, but is also a better functioning design than most offer, plus it is always fun to work on your car :D


    Note: We did this to a VE Series 2 SV6, but there is no reason it couldn't be done to any VE as most of them have a blanked off brake cooling duct and plenty of space behgind it from the piping. It would actually be easier to do on cars without fog lights!!!
     

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