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Mazda's new Motor - Idling Stop Technology

FstStig

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Hey Guys,

As I was an Apprentice Mechanic last year I was signed up with IAME and I get their Mag whenever they send it out. Found this article rather interesting about Mazda's new motors. Not sure if anyone would be interested in this, but will post it anyway.

The first Mazda equipped with i-stop, the company's award-winning idling stop system, is now undergoing local testing ahead of next year's Australian launch of the fuel saving Technology.

Idling stop systems save fuel by automatically shutting down the engine when teh car is static, and restarting it when the car returns to motion. While conventional idling stop systems rely on a starter motor to restart the engine, Mazda's "i-Stop" restarts the engine through combustion: Fuel is directly injected into a cylinder while the engine is stopped and ignited to generate downward piston force. The result is a quick and quiet engine re-start compared to other systems, and a significant saving in fuel.

Piston stop position control and combustion restart technology enabling engine re-start on 0.35 seconds. To restart engine by combustion, compression -stroke and expansion-stoke pistons need to be stopped at the correct positions to create the right balance of air volumes. Mazda's "i-stop" ensures precise control over the piston positions during engine shutdown - of all the pistons stopped at the optimum positions, the system identifies the initial cylinder for fuel injection and ignites, to restart the engine. Even at extremely low rpm, cylinders are sequentially identified for ignition, making the engine quickly pick up idle speed. As the driver lifts the brake pedal to continue driving fuel is injected directly into the cylinder, atomised, then ignited forcing the piston down. At the same time, the starter motor applies a small amount of additional momentum to the crankshaft resulting in an extremely quick and refined restart of the engine.

So what do we all think? I personally think its a good step towards making the cars more fuel efficient, but at the same time, all the technology and sensors going into it. More things to go wrong and I would think to have these things replaced would be costing an arm and a leg. I also think it would really suck in start and stop traffic, Just can't see how it would be efficient in that type of traffic condition.


Opinions good and bad are welcome :)

Mumbo
 

Pub247

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Umm terrible name whats with all the i #### these days

The technology is nothing new plenty of different manufacturers have and all mazda done has improved the technology.
 

nemesis_adrasteia

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pretty sure mercedes has already tried this(i think it was them) good idea though
 

sik_dose

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Would be a crappy start to a street race. Two completly silent cars side by side at the lights.
 

FstStig

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Why the hell would you even street race whatever car this is going to be. Can only see it being in one of these little buzz box mazda makes.
 

Jesterarts

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Or further more, why the hell would you street race?

BMW have this type of system in their latest M3. There are are few other cars out there that have this.

I think it's a great idea in non-performance vehicles. It would also be great in stop/start traffic etc.

I'm of the opinion that the greatest waste of fuel is when you are stilling at the lights or a traffic jam. So this strikes me as a good idea.

It would be interesting to see the results of a side by side test though. one vehicle with the i-Stop system and another exactly the safe without.

In the country and on highways it would obviously yield no benefits but around the city, I imagine there would be a considerable saving in fuel.
 

Darren_L

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sounds like a good idea, although I think the driver should be able to disable the mode (with a switch) if they wish, as I could see it being a pain in peak hour traffic where you start/stop every 30 seconds or so. Even though the startup delay is supposed to be less than a second, it would become annoying all the same with repeated start/stops.
 

Jecs

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the hino hybrid trucks have this system. pull it out of gear and release clutch an it would shut down an would kick back over when you put the clutch back in. didnt feel right sitting at a set lights not hearing an engine running. but ye its old technology.
 
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