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Not this again, which engine oil?

Skydrol

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The thing is that certain engine parts do reach temps as high as that. In fact even bulk sump oil can reach temperatures as high as 130 or so since that's mentioned in the Nissan GT-R owners manual (they say dump the oil asap if it ever reaches 130 LOL)
Realy, says that? That is interesting. Yes I do believe the crankcase oil can reach higher temps since it travles around the engine, not the same passages as the coolant but other areas with no way to go out (exchange heat). The Crankcase Oil Pan is not a good Heat Dissipator, might help transfering some heat but does not have a good way to do a good heat transfer. The only way I see the oil to cool properly is with an Oil Cooler or have a Crankcase Dry Sump and use the remote reservoir as a cooler. The reason for a bigger oil pan is too give the oil time to cool a bit and to keep the engine with a constant flow (oil moves around during corenering, de/acceleration, inclines, etc...). Coolant temps depending on the engine (most US Cars) does not go above the boling point (100C/212F), they run about 88C/190F for normal operating temp, and about 99C/210F for the fans to kick in. If you reach 100C/212F easy, is your warning of some bad is about to happen or your system is deficient.

Keep in mind, the temp reading comes from the coollant's hottest spot (cooling system wise, around the engine coolant out hose). The crankcase (the PCV system is not a good heat extractor), perhaps is much hotter, only way to tell how hot is to install an Engine Oil Temp Sensor.
 

BlackoutSteve

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Well we all know how much GM loves to supersede part nos. Is your manual actually from 1969??...
Of course it's a superseded part number.. The whole manual is full of superseded part numbers that no longer work.. It's from 1969.
This is a superseded number from the 1967 manual.
https://global.ihs.com/doc_detail.cfm?document_name=9985002&item_s_key=00394780

If you were familiar with GM numbers, you'd see straight away that these are numbers from that era..
If the part gets changed, improved, revised, the number also is changed.
Those numbers won't do anything for you are a GM dealer today except get you the modern version with the modern number.

With zinc.. Do you think adding zinc to oil is a new thing?
Several of the engines those oils were used in were solid lifter with moderate spring pressures. Of course they knew about using zinc.
 

XUV

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Just buy what ever syn oil they have on special on said day and you won't go far wrong.
 

VR38

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Are there any professionals here that could recommend an oil to use or is it just by trying different oil grades the best way to see which oil is most suitable to an engine.
I know this subject is never ending but I am concerned that we might be using the wrong oil or does it really matter which oil we use.
Sorry you asked yet? LOL.

FWIW if your car is standard then refer to the owners hand book for correct oil selection and change intervals.
Holden has been spending billions of dollars for more years than most of us have even owned one.
If you have mechanical issues then it is quite clear changing oil is not going to fix them, neither is a choice in weight on the thin or thick side (within scope Holdens recommendations) going to cause you mechanical problems.
I would suggest getting three quotes from competent mechanics and starting a new thread if a mechanical problem exists.
 
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With zinc.. Do you think adding zinc to oil is a new thing?
Several of the engines those oils were used in were solid lifter with moderate spring pressures. Of course they knew about using zinc.
No that was a rushed comment edit. What i meant to say is that the addition of ZDDP is a giveaway that its an old formulation and needs the ZDDP in order to protect adequately. Most modern 30 weight oils have low zinc levels especially ILSAC grades as that is a requirement of the "resource conserving" certification.
Any oil can be loaded up with ZDDP but then it will kill cats...of course its no issue in a car built before anyone worried about emissions.
 
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NeddyBear

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I don't have a good understanding of the V6 engine so last weekend we bought a used 2002 V6 engine for $100 and what I'm doing is pulling it apart to see how the engine comes apart and to see whats inside.
 

Skydrol

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Well... there is no need to spend $100 to see the engine inside. They are plenty diagrams in the web to look and to be honest, is just like a V8 minus 2 cylinders ;)
 

VR38

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I don't have a good understanding of the V6 engine so last weekend we bought a used 2002 V6 engine for $100 and what I'm doing is pulling it apart to see how the engine comes apart and to see whats inside.

Well done, what a fantastic idea.
My first job when I left school was as a engine builder.
What an eye opener being hands on.
Do yourself a favour and get a holden hand book and some measuring tools so you can see what is worn and where then you can deduce why.
 

BlackoutSteve

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Yep, great idea.. This is the best way to learn.
I thoroughly recommend text books, BUT all the text books in the world won't put a spanner in your hand and give one bit of hands-on experience.

Keep parts organized and labelled and note their orientation as the engine comes apart. This way you'll be able to see patterns if you're interested in how an engine normally and perhaps abnormally wears.

Depending on your intent, you can buy cheap micrometer sets and telescoping bore measuring tools that can really help you understand clearances etc.
Used Mitutoyo stuff is great value.
 
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