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Replacing Brake Fluid

maccasparks

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How do you replace the brake fluid - I hear it should be done every 2 years. Is it just a case of bleeding it through to the furtherist caliper( left rear) - can you just pump it through or do you need to close the bleed nipple every time???
 

VYMAD

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I'm going to get mine done by a brake place but only because I'm not sure what the go is with it having A.B.S.
 

Calaber

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Bleeding brakes is quite simple but there are a couple of things to keep in mind.

1. The first is, don't do it on humid days. Brake fluid is very hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs moisture very easily.
2. Keep your brake fluid container capped when not using it.
3. Always ensure that the master cylinder has fluid in it - don't bleed it until you reach the bottom, or you will have to start all over again.
4. Unless you have the equipment, brake bleeding needs an assistant to pump the brake pedal.
5. Remove any spilt fluid immediately, it will damage paintwork quickly if not removed.

Have about two spare bottles of fresh fluid before starting. Because modern cars have dual circuit brakes, you can bleed either end first, but the old advice to do the one furthest from the master cylinder first is still good advice.

Open the valve and leave it open. Connect a piece of clear plastic tubing to the end of the valve and insert the other end in a clean glass jar. Pump the brake pedal about six times with the valve left open, then close the valve. Top up the cylinder and repeat the cycle. Do this until you stgart getting clean fluid through the plastic pipe. Once you get clean fluid, have your assistant pump the brake pedal a couple of times, then hold the pedal to the floor and nip up the valve.

Repeat this cycle for all wheels, gradually working from rear passenger to rear driver, front passenger and front driver side wheels. Keep checking the fluid level between sets of six pumps and top up to operating level each time.

After bleeding all wheels, check brake pedal feel and road test. Dump old brake fluid - don't be tempted to "keep it for emergencies".

As far as I know, the ABS simply adds to the amount of bleeding required. I cannot think olf any complications with ABS which would prevent this job being done at home.
 
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