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VF SV6 - should I keep it?

Thrakka

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Hey all.

I currently have a 2014 VF SV6 with just under 100k on it. It’s white with bonnet stripes, low profile rear spoiler and 20” rims (were on the car when I bought it new). Been toying the idea of upgrading to another brand, but to be honest I’m actually still pretty happy with my car. I’ve read in multiple posts that people believe the VF series value will hold/go up relatively quickly, but I assume that’s for the SSV Redlines etc. Do you think the SV6s will hold their value / go up as well?
 

Forg

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No, it won't hold it's value substantially better than any other car on the used market that's not considered a POS.
But if money & value is your main motivating factor in whether or not to sell it & buy something newer; it'll be cheaper to keep it (of course there are exceptions, there always are, your rich cousin might be willing to swap you his 1yo Civic Type-R for your SV6 for example - but in 99% of cases upgrading is going to always cost more in the long-run).
 

Big Red VF-SII Go-kart

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The SV6 VF I and II will probably be around $6,000 (100,000km+) 9-10 years from now. Demand will be very low, with the transition to electric vehicles.
The VF is not a sparkling Porsche nor a macho Maserati, but a Holden. Speculatively, RESERVE issues (specials bought by factory workers on leaving), will command a bit of attention and cash by collectors tugging at the forelocks of a bygone era when Sixes ruled the roads, but for the rest of us, no - - no pot of gold, either for V6 or V8. Just look after it, and enjoy the final fruits of Holden's legacy, because we'll likely be stuck with a Tesla 10 years forward.
 

figjam

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because we'll likely be stuck with a Chinese made Tesla 10 years forward.
Just amended your prediction.

To the OP, don't expect it to be blue chip investment. You say you are happy with it, but considering an upgrade to another brand. That indicates that you are not happy with it, so make the jump.
 

Derekthetree

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As per above, no. Even the moderately rarified VF stuff will struggle to accumulate I think.

I think Grand Tour had it best.
To be a classic a car has to be two of these three: rare, beautiful, interesting. If it's not, why will people desire it.
 

gtrboyy

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If it has sentimental value then keep it.

Think down the track ls3 & lsa powered models will be what people will want to buy
 

Skylarking

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All cars depreciate and all cars need basic maintenance, the former having a bigger impact than the later on a per year basis. With fixed price maintenance these days, costs would be comparable whatever you own so let’s dismiss it for simplicity.

So, as long as a car can serve it’s purpose reliably, the longer one keeps the car, the less it costs in depreciation per year.

Put it this way, buy a new car for $30k and keep it for 3 years before selling for $15k will cost the owner $5k per year in depreciation. Keep it for 6 years before selling for $6k will cost the owner $4k per year. Keep it for 10 years before selling for $2k will cost $2800 per year. Keeping it for 20 years before giving it away will cost $1500 per year. At some stage after 20 years, it may start to increase in value, maybe, which would reduce the per year depreciation costs... it’d have to be a special car to recoup its initial purchase price and then to start making money....

In any case, the longer you keep a car, the less depreciation costs the owner per year but wanting and needing something has nothing to do with cost and more to do with psychology. Trying to work out what something may be worth in the future is more akin to psychic tarot reading astrological fortune tellering. :eek:

Basically, drive what you can afford to enjoy ;)
 

Forg

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^ Safety chucks an extra value-spanner in the works too, particularly if you’re handing the car to your better-half to drive all the time or your offspring are being carted around in it. I reckon that within the same style of car, safety tends to get significantly better around every 7 years or so, I guess that’s about 1.5 model-cycles.
 

Skylarking

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^ Yes, safety very much adds another dimension to upgrading
Silly me didn’t consider safety because well we’re all such good drivers :eek: :p

I sometimes have a sneaking suspicion that many still update primarily for vanity but use safety or fuel economy as some post purchase justification o_O
 
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