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Victoria Police Crewman Divisional Van event

Discussion in 'News/Updates' started by Darren, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. dv8-01

    dv8-01 typical hoon figure

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    they look alright,it'll grow on ppl eventually..
     
  2. helly

    helly FUZZ

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    Try maybe 4...

    You'd be lucky to fit 4 cops in the crewman... We have tested one up in NSW and with all the crap that has to be carried around with you, like ballistic vests and kit bags, fire extinguishers, maps, torches on charging posts, computer (MDT), radio and light system controllers, you can only fit 4 at most.

    It was the same in the Rodeo's aswell...

    The biggest benefit is how much better they perform compared to the old paddy wagons. Its lower and has much less body roll. The downside is they don't go places the Rodeo's do... Try getting up over a normal street gutter with 4 bodies on board, go on I dare ya!!!

    Quite honeslty I think the new toyota Hilux Dual Cab would be a cracker!!!
     
  3. Patrio7

    Patrio7 3Y3 K4N 5P33K 1337.

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    maybe they should of based it off the aventra or equvilent

    could almost imagine a police 4x4 wagon, that'd scare me if it tailed me
     
  4. RKZ234

    RKZ234 Guest

    The Crewman is certainly a lot less of a multi purpose vehicle than the 2wd Rodeo. The Crewman is best suited to the outer urban areas. Inner city is better off with the Rodeo for mounting gutters and traffic islands etc. Otherwise there are going to be a lot of Crewmans with their underbellies badly battle scarred and punnished.

    I still think the Commodore Ute would be a better vehicle to base the Prisoner Transport Van (PTV) on. The extra seating in the Crewie isn't really warranted, when you take into consideration the increased fuel bill incurred and the limitations of use which come with the Great White Hearse.

    Then there's the whole safety issue of reversing the thing!!!

    Draw the short straw = observer for the shift, meaning you will be getting out to guide every single time the vehicle is reversed.
     
  5. ozute

    ozute Guest

    Hey thanks for posting the pics DEMNVT, they look alright I reckon ;)
     
  6. Torquative

    Torquative Sports Economy

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    I dont think the idea of a 4 door paddy wagon will work unless its based off something like the Hilux

    As with alot of you guys, we tried the crewman as well. We ended up buying an Adventra for the pure fact the rear seat was far more comfortable and more spacious then the Crewmans, although we honestly could have used the ute side of the Crewman!

    Its really suited to kids or smaller adults, I wouldnt like to try to cram 3 people in the back, let alone 2. When I sat in it I was too squashed literally, and that was with the front seat a fair way forward.

    As for why they would need a 4 door paddy wagon beats me, unless its in the country. The rodeos rarely get a work out with someone in the back seat, I say rarely because I acknowledge the fact that occasionally they do

    Agree'd, although I suppose like the Rodeo counterpart the rear seat will also serve as a useful crap collector including rain coats, jackets, folders and various paperwork!

    My 2 cents anyway
     
  7. RKZ234

    RKZ234 Guest

    Victoria Police currently use a BA Falcon Ute with a modified version of the same pods used on the VS Commodore ute. These pods already have storage lockers for rain coats, ballistic vests, traffic cones etc.

    The Mercedes Sprinter and Vito both have a wide variety of fit out options, ranging from as little as 2 Police & upto 12 prisoners - Sprinter, to more universally usable fitouts of 5 Police & 4 prisoners - Vito, or 5 Police and 6 prisoners - Sprinter.

    So when you look serioulsy at the "Great White Hearse" it's hard to fathom just what the point of them is, as there are better alternatives.

    You can transport more Police, more comfortably in a Sprinter and a Vito, as well as more prisoners in a significantly safer interchangeable Prisoner Module.
    Their only issue is asthmatic performance.

    But if speed was the issue, then the Crewman wouldn't get the nod over the Ute. Several big issues arise with the Crewman. Turning circle & fuel consumption, which also creates a range in between fills issue, quickly jump out.

    The fuel tank's actual usable capacity is questionable, with aparrently about 10lt of the 70lt capacity retained in reserve to lubricate and cool the fuel pump. 60lt useable doesn't get you too far in a vehicle which uses about 20lt/100km around town and about 14lt on the hwy.

    So, I still believe a Commodore Ute based PTV for most General Duties situations is sufficient and also a much cheaper option too.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 15, 2005
  8. studleyman

    studleyman Guest

    Police crewman - not to good

    Hey guys just saw this thread

    As for the crewman well, Ive had some involvement, and it has many issues. Some are
    Ventilation
    There is little ventilation in the prisoner compartment. The first model had two vents at the side of the prisoner seating area. These are still there today, only after ventilation was pointed out they added a grill to the back door. If the vehicle isn't in motion there is no air. Not good during summer. If I was locked in the back, I'd probably try to kick my way out, just so i could breath.
    Rear Compartment
    The floor paneling is grooved, which is good for drainage, although there is no drain and where the rear door panelling sits the edge is raised, which is no good, considering you get drunks being sick in there, not mention blood, urine etc. If you wash it all out the floor is still wet, up to the grooves.
    Police equipment
    All radios etc are mounted in the prisoner compartment behind the fibre glass panels. If you wanted to or had tools etc, you could kick the middle hump and break the cover, then help yourself. If the first prisoner didn't break it on will in a year or so, after someone has weakend it. Also I pitty the guy who has to get in the back to replace/repair anything.
    Side windows
    These are only siliconed on. It's a good grade silicone but if the prisoner has a pen or knife etc they can start to pick off the window. Once again if he doesn't break it the next prisoner will. Although these windows are very small, and only a small person could fit out of one. Although there is a back door window.
    Emergency exit hatch
    This is mounted in the roof. It is perfect if you ant to lay on your back and use your legs to break out. As above if not immediately, it will break eventually. You would be surprised at the amount of flex generated when you do this.
    Vehicle
    It's pretty good. The prisoner cell, ways next to nothing as it's mainly all fibre glass. No weight issues like the current divi vans which are all steel. The vehicle allows for the transportation of extra members and witness's. The vehicle has plenty of get up and go. In theory you could fit 5 people, but it's police, with equipment belts etc. If the driver is 6 foot or taller then forget trying to sit behind him. The back to doors on the unit are suppost to be for the bullet proof vests. The only problem, our vests are to big for the compartment.
    There are many little issues like this.
    Another one, that I don't like is the emergency lights. They look good now, but picture the vehicle in a high 30 degree day, with the sun shining. Unless you are looking directly at the lights you would be lucky to see them operating. The problem has been resolved a little bit, with the removal of the original clear lids, and the addition of the red and blue. It's just a darker cover, which helps stop sunlight penetration, making the lights a little more visable.

    Well that my two cents worth. Any comments?
     
  9. natooo

    natooo New Member

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    I think ive seen them down here in geelong.. i could be wrong but i remember the back canopy looking like them now they look very odd indeed but hey not like they are there for looks its practicality(if thats a word)
     

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