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Bleeding brakes after changing pads

Discussion in 'VZ Holden Commodore (2004 - 2006)' started by SKNOT9, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. SKNOT9

    SKNOT9 All hope is gone

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    How do I bleed my brakes after changing pads, they feel a bit spongy after taking them for a drive. I have looked at the other posts but noone gives a full run through of how to do it if u have never done it before. l dont know what or where the "nipple" is?
     
  2. Surfwagon

    Surfwagon Well-Known Member

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    A couiple of questions first.

    Was the pedal spongy before you changed the pads?
    If no, then the problem isn't in bleeding.
    If yes, then you need to bleed the brakes.

    Did you machine the discs before fitting the new pads.
    If no, then there is your problem, get the discs machined to remove any ridge and bumps as the new pads are flat and your old disc would have valleys and ridges.
    If yes, then go back to bleeding.

    To bleed get a one man bleeding kit from your local parts shop.
    The bleed nipple is at the rear and top of your caliper.
    Place car, front or rear or both on stands.
    Firstly using the correct size "Ring" spanner (not an open end spanner) crack the seal on the nipple, it may be quite hard to undo.
    Once cracked loose, retighten lightly.
    Now attach bleeding hose to nipple with your ring spanner still on the nipple.
    With hose and spanner in place undo nipple and leave open.
    Next make sure Master cylinder is up to full mark, if not top up with fresh brake fluid.
    This is how I do it by myself.
    I place my left hand on the brake pedal while I look under the car in the direction of the wheel being bled and pump the pedal until i se no air bubbles flowing in the stream of fluid then stop pumping and go around and tighten the nipple closed.
    Now test the pedal with your foot, does it feel better.
    Repeat for each wheel, starting with wheel to be bled closest to the master cylinder.
    Thats how I do it and have never had a problem.
    Just fitted and bled HSV/AP racing barkes to my Senator this way.

    SW
     
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  3. SKNOT9

    SKNOT9 All hope is gone

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    thanks heaps for that, Rep given :). Yeh i put new rotors on also. I thought you always have to bleed the brakes after a pad change?
     
  4. Surfwagon

    Surfwagon Well-Known Member

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    No, only need to push the pistons back in and check fluid levels.
    Maybe your brakes need bedding in.
    Pick a nice quiet piece of road long enough to do about 4-6 moderate to hard brakes from 60kph.
    Each time don't come to a complete stop and cruise slowly back up to 60 then do it again.
    Don't rush back up to 60 to give the brakes time cool a little before the next application.
     
  5. gungazza

    gungazza Active Member

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    i thoght that you started at the wheel lh rear to start bleeding
     
  6. Torquative

    Torquative Sports Economy

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    supposed to go from the furthest caliper to the master cylinder/reservoir to the closest.

    In this case the master cylinder/reservoir is near the steering wheel but in the engine bay yeh?

    So the LHR caliper is the most furthest away, followed by the RHR, then the LHF and finally the RHF.

    You want to be removing all air bubbles from the system without them re-entering.
     
  7. (CODEZ)

    (CODEZ) formerly cody_vp92

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    I done work experience at a local mechanic a couple of weeks ago and this is the way that I was taught to do it :thumbsup:
     
  8. Surfwagon

    Surfwagon Well-Known Member

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    These all apply if all the hoses were removed and replaced at the same time, but if you only do one caliper and hose at a time it doesn't matter which wheel you start from.
    The main things are always keep the master above 1/2 full .
    Second have the hose already connected to your new caliper before changing over at the body connection.
    I had no problems with spongy pedal or air in the ABS.

    Col.
     

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