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Did my RB30 skip a tooth?

Discussion in 'VL Holden Commodore (1986 - 1988)' started by Namey16627, Apr 14, 2019.

  1. Namey16627

    Namey16627 New Member

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    Hi there
    Because my GQ RB30 (I know not a Commodore but I hope you can help me as we share the engine :)was due for a timing belt I decided to change it out this weekend. In the process of loosening the crankshaft pulley retaining bolt the engine was spon anti clockwise about 4-5 times. I think in general this could cause it to skip a tooth on the belt right?
    I didn't worrie about that too much afterwards and proceeded as described in my Gregory's. But now I am just not sure if the dowel pin on the camshaft is at the upmost position when piston 1 is at TDC. It looks like it is a bit more to the right, but the engine is also tilted a bit to the right so now I am wondering if it has to be at topmost from my point of view or the engines.
    I have installed the new belt already and the engine spins free when I crank it by hand, also both valves are shut when the crankshaft gear mark aligns with the oil pump housing mark.
    Just want to make sure and get some more opinions. Pictures are attached.
    Thanks in advance !
     

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  2. VT&VX

    VT&VX Active Member

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    For others who want to replace the timing belt...
    Replacing timing belt, there is a vid online, that shows the method where the belt that is still on the car is cut along half its width.
    So now it looks like you have two half width timing belts on the car.
    So remove the front belt and this clears half the timing cog, while still holding alignment.
    Push the new belt to half on and then cut the remaining section of the old belt away. Then push the new timing belt the rest of the way.

    This method keeps alignment (assuming it was correct before)
     
    losh1971 likes this.

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