Rubber blocks for jacking a VF

Forg

Well-Known Member
I’ve only seen the scissor-jack in the boot for the first time recently ... frankly the idea of jacking the painted undersides of our car using that metal Thing horrifies me slightly, I hope we never get a flat while on the move!

But it did occur to me, maybe I need to get one of those rubber blocks with a slit in the top of it, so I can place it where the scissor-jack is supposed to go when jacking-up the car (either using the trolley-jack or a hoist). At the moment I’m putting a rubber block behind that thin metal seam which the scissor-jack straddles, but I’m thinking it might be better if I get those slotted rubber blocks to jack the VF on.

All the slotted hockey-puck thingies on eBay only have a depth of 15mm for the slot in the top of them, anyone know whether that’s deep enough for a VF? [and yes I’m aware I could just go measure it :)]
 

greenacc

Searching for the billion
I've seen some on the Repco website but I can't find them now. Maybe ask at the counter next time. 15mm might do the job but 20or25mm probably better.
 

Anthony121

Well-Known Member
I’ve only seen the scissor-jack in the boot for the first time recently ... frankly the idea of jacking the painted undersides of our car using that metal Thing horrifies me slightly, I hope we never get a flat while on the move!

But it did occur to me, maybe I need to get one of those rubber blocks with a slit in the top of it, so I can place it where the scissor-jack is supposed to go when jacking-up the car (either using the trolley-jack or a hoist). At the moment I’m putting a rubber block behind that thin metal seam which the scissor-jack straddles, but I’m thinking it might be better if I get those slotted rubber blocks to jack the VF on.

All the slotted hockey-puck thingies on eBay only have a depth of 15mm for the slot in the top of them, anyone know whether that’s deep enough for a VF? [and yes I’m aware I could just go measure it :)]
The scissor jack sits in a jacking point on the car. I also use this with my trolley jack these days as it is one of the best spots to jack the car up. No rubber with metal on metal and no damage.
 

Forg

Well-Known Member
The scissor jack sits in a jacking point on the car. I also use this with my trolley jack these days as it is one of the best spots to jack the car up. No rubber with metal on metal and no damage.
I assume, but could be wrong, that the reason the scissor jack 'straddles' that pinch-welded seam of metal poking down is just so that the person using the scissor jack puts it in the right place? ie. so the two load-bearing surfaces of the jack put the pressure either inboard & outboard of that seam where the frame's designed to take that weight.

So … I've been putting the rubber block atop my trolley-jack inboard of that seam (but touching that seam).

It's a little bit fiddly though, so I'd like a rubber block with a slot cut into it, so that rubber block can straddle the seam in exactly the same way as the scissor-jack does.
 

Big Red VF-SII Go-kart

I love puddles.
There is a proper place for the scissor jack under there, on all cars, and believe me, having changed a lot of tyres in my travels (most notably in blazing outback heat), this talk of damage to paintwork etc is frankly, imaginary stuff -- doesn't happen, at all; the important thing is to get the wheel of, put on a replacement and continue the drive, never mind about finding touch-up paint, a brush and box of Kleenex. The inclusion of a rubber block will only add to the risk of the block compressing, and the jack slipping under load (I have actually been a witness to this happening on a farm in country Victoria in 1996, which crushed the owner), or if the car should move (now this: surprise, surprise how many people don't apply the park brake or transmission park in their haste to tackle the changing of a wheel...).

Consider too that if your ride does not have flaps, the underside and skirts will be peppered with roadblast every time you drive out.
 
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Forg

Well-Known Member
There is a proper place for the scissor jack under there, on all cars, and believe me, having changed a lot of tyres in my travels (most notably in blazing outback heat), this talk of damage to paintwork etc is frankly, imaginary stuff -- doesn't happen, at all; the important thing is to get the wheel of, put on a replacement and continue the drive, never mind about finding touch-up paint, a brush and box of Kleenex. The inclusion of a rubber block will only add to the risk of the block compressing, and the jack slipping under load
Umm ... this proposed block isn’t for using with that nasty scissor-jack for emergency use only in the boot, it’s for use with my trolley-jack & the 2-post hoist in the shed.

The damage to paint isn’t imaginary, BTW, plenty of jacking-points have scratches & scrapes where the jack goes. Not the end of the world, but I’d prefer not to subject the car to it.

The cutting of the slots in a ‘puck’ of rubber, as per panhead’s suggestion, isn’t an awful one; except I need to buy the things in the first place anyway & eBay is littered with cheap options that already have a 15mm-deep slot cut in them. I guess I can combine the two; buy it, try it, cut the slot deeper if it ain’t enough. :)
 

lmoengnr

Well-Known Member
Umm ... this proposed block isn’t for using with that nasty scissor-jack for emergency use only in the boot, it’s for use with my trolley-jack & the 2-post hoist in the shed.
Don't most trolley jacks and 2 post hoists have integral rubber jack pads?
Refer to the handbook for suitable points for 2 post hoists and trolley jacks, there are specific points on the pan for lifting.
 

greenacc

Searching for the billion
Workshops would have rubber pads but I have never seen a rubber pad come with an average trolley jack. It would be good if it did.
 

lmoengnr

Well-Known Member
Workshops would have rubber pads but I have never seen a rubber pad come with an average trolley jack. It would be good if it did.
I have 2 different trolley jacks, both with rubber pads, all the 2 post hoists I've seen have rubber jack pads.
 

Mattricho

Well-Known Member
Is this what your looking for?
DD3DA7E6-B1D4-4F11-8E90-5DBCEE05AEBA.jpeg

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https://www.ebay.com.au/ulk/itm/264117787883

I bought some of these for my supercheap special trolley jack that doesn’t have any rubber pads.
 

Mattricho

Well-Known Member
Oh sorry missed that bit.

on my jack I need to turn the rubber sideways so that I’m jacking off the rubber. The rubber pads aren’t deep enough for my jack.

348468E2-B633-4970-BCBD-AE5A91827BCA.jpegE5619848-50FE-4D36-8259-B29EAC34BD0D.jpeg70A27801-D03D-44EB-9DD9-9ACE3BEC0CBB.jpeg
 
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